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Hampstead School

Social Sciences

GEOGRAPHY

A Level

Awarding body: Pearson Edexcel

What will I learn?

In Year 12, you will study the following topics:

Globalisation Regenerating Places Tectonic Processes and Hazards Coastal landscapes and Change

In Year 13, you will study the following topics:

Superpowers Migration, Sovereignty and Identity The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security

There is also a third paper that you sit which is a synoptic paper based on the themes of players, attitudes and actions, futures and uncertainties. This draws on knowledge from each of the topics.

Coursework is completed in Year 13 and this independent investigation makes up 20% of your final grade.

What can I do at the end of the course?

Studying geography will prepare you for many forms of employment as well as further study. Studying geography enables students to be inspired by their geographical understanding, to engage critically with real work issues and places and to apply their geographical skills and theory to the world around them. Students will grow as independent thinkers and informed and engaged citizens, who understand their role and importance of geography as one of the key disciplines relevant to understanding the world’s changing peoples, places and environments.


CRIMINOLOGY

Applied Diploma

Awarding body: WJEC

What will I learn?

Criminology is the study of crime and criminal behaviour.  During this two-year course you will examine the different types of crimes that take place in our society and how we decide what should and should not be classified as a crime. You will explore some of the explanations for offending behaviour in an attempt to understand what factors contribute to crime.  You will gain an understanding of the criminal justice system and the roles of different professionals who work within that sector.

Students will be assessed through a combination of internal controlled assessments and external formal examinations. 

Unit 1: Changing Awareness of Crime

This unit will enable students to demonstrate understanding of different types of crime, influences on perceptions of crime and why some crimes are unreported.

Internal assessment

25% of Diploma

Unit 2: Criminological Theories

This unit will allow students to gain an understanding of why people commit crime, drawing on what they have learned in Unit 1.

90 minute written exam

75 marks

25% of diploma

Unit 3: Crime Scene to Courtroom

The third unit will provide an understanding of the criminal justice system from the moment a crime has been identified to the verdict.  Students will develop the understanding and skills needed to examine information in order to review the justice of verdicts in criminal cases.

Internal assessment

25% of Diploma

Unit 4: Crime and Punishment

In the final unit, students will apply their understanding of the awareness of criminality, criminological theories and the process of bringing an accused to court in order to evaluate the effectiveness of social control to deliver criminal justice policy.

90 minute written exam

75 marks

25% of diploma

What can I do at the end of the course?

Studying an Applied Diploma in Criminology offers detailed insight into criminal behaviour, the criminal justice system and policy making in relation to crime.  It can be studied alongside subjects such as Sociology, Psychology and Politics A Level.  Students who study Criminology may go on to study degrees in Criminology, Sociology, Psychology, Law and Politics. 

It can assist students in careers in the probation service, forensic psychology, the police force, the civil service and local government.


HISTORY

A Level

Awarding body: AQA

What will I learn?

Component 1:

Stuart Britain and the Crisis of Monarchy, 1603-1702

  • Year 12: Absolutism challenged: Britain, 1603-1649
  • Year 13: Monarchy restored and limited monarchy, 1649-1702

Component 2:

Democracy and Nazism, 1918-1945

  • Year 12: The Weimar Republic, 1918–1933
  • Year 13: Nazi Germany 1933-1945

Component 3:

Civil Rights in the USA, 1865-1965 (Coursework)

  • Year 13: 3,000 word non-examined assessment

What can I do at the end of the course?

Studying History prepares you with skills in evaluation, debate, investigation, source analysis and cross-referencing. History enables a critical study of the present. You will be able to evaluate sources of information in the media. You will be able to contextualise the political decisions of today by assessing the background of the people and the nation that it affects.. As a result the study of History offers you flexibility and provides a solid foundation for further study and career options. A level History can lead to a range of higher education opportunities such as History, Law, International Studies, Art History, PPE and many more.

By the end of the course, you will hopefully have taken part in one of the trips running: Easter 2019 to Berlin. Aside from this, there are frequent trips to places such as the British Museum, Tower of London and other historical landmarks.


PSYCHOLOGY

A Level

Awarding body: AQA

What will I learn?

Psychology is the study of people, behaviour and the mind. It is classified as a science subject, and this is reflected in the A level curriculum. It is a broad subject, and the A Level considers many different approaches towards explaining behaviour. Psychologists observe human behaviour, create theories to explain the behaviour, and then carry out research to test these theories.

Students will sit a total of three exams at the end of year 13. The A Level psychology qualification will have a maths component worth at least 10%.

Paper 1: Introductory topics in psychology

  • This paper explores four topics of interest - social influence, memory, attachment and psychopathology.
  • 33.3% of A Level 96 marks in total 2 hour written exam

Paper 2: Psychology in context

  • This paper looks at some of the main approaches within psychology including the learning, cognitive, biological, psychodynamic and humanistic approach. Research methods and biopsychology are also explored.
  • 33.3% of A Level 96 marks in total 2 hour written exam

Paper 3: Issues and options in psychology

  • For this paper you will need to know about issues and debates in psychology such as the nature vs nurture debate and free will and determinism. Various forms of bias in research will be considered and you will study three option areas in psychology in detail: gender, schizophrenia and forensic psychology. 
  • 33.3% of A Level 96 marks in total 2 hour written exam

What can I do at the end of the course?

Study of psychology at A Level offers you a unique academic experience as you will learn how to better understand and explain human behaviour whilst simultaneously developing the skills to critically evaluate scientific processes and psychological theories. As psychology gives you an opportunity to learn, understand and evaluate issues happening around you in your everyday life, you can then apply these to the wider world.

As a university subject, psychology is popular. Graduates enter a wide range of employment sectors from clinical to forensic psychology, advertising and sports.


SOCIOLOGY

A Level

Awarding body: AQA

What will I learn?

Year 12

  • SCLY 1: Families and Households
  • SCLY 2: Education and methods

Year 13

  • SCLY 3: Beliefs in society
  • SCLY 4: Crime and deviance with methods in context

What can I do at the end of the course?

Sociology is a widely popular subject and it prepares you with skills in evaluation, debate, investigation, and understanding our society. As a result the study of Sociology offers you flexibility and provides a solid foundation for further study and career options. You will also be able to understand the decisions of policy in our country and the reactions of society to these.

Study of A level Sociology can lead to a range of higher education opportunities such as, Law, International Studies, Art History, History and many more. In addition a degree in Sociology offers you a wealth of career options including; law, journalism, accounting, finance, teaching, advertising, criminology, public administration, think tanks and many more.